What’s in a (Historical Place) Name?

Previously I blogged about my efforts in coming up with fictional surnames for the characters in my historical fiction WIP.

These names had to be Anglo-Norman in origin, and involved me increasing my French vocabulary, researching Norman toponymy, and a ton of trial and error to create nice-looking names.

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What’s in a (Historical Character) Name?

I’m continuing to answer the burning questions about writing as part of my 10th writing birthday celebration.

Previously, I answered a question from my good friend, Lydia.  But there was a second question that she put before me:

How do you come up with interesting character names in your work?

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The Joy Burden of Sex in the Middle Ages – pt. 2 (Medieval Mondays #10a)

(Continued from Part 1)

The previous post on sex in the Middle Ages discussed its various contradictions as espoused by the medieval Church.

Another important inconsistency was that even though sex was considered a requirement between spouses, this didn’t mean just any sexual act was acceptable.

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So, You Want to Start a Critique Group – pt. 2

(Continued from Part 1)

I’ve previously blogged about my efforts in forming a critique group.

More specifically, that post was about all the things I demanded of prospective members in order to prove their interest, commitment, and ability to do the necessary work of critiquing.

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The Joy Burden of Sex in the Middle Ages – pt. 1 (Medieval Mondays #10a)

Sex and sexual relationships in the Middle Ages, much like during any age, were fraught with contradictions.

Most of these contradictions stemmed from the involvement of the medieval Church in dictating proper sexual conduct.  In turn, according to Marty Williams and Anne Echols, authors of Between Pit and Pedestal: Women in the Middle Ages, the Church’s involvement was owing to the fact that,

Many theologians were completely unable to reconcile sex and the sacred because sex was viewed as something unholy and unclean (p. 86). 

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Any Given Sunday in the Middle Ages (Medieval Mondays #9b)

As discussed in the previous post on the medieval Church, church life in the Middle Ages was life.

The services it provided contributed to every key turning point in people’s existence.  According to John R.H. Moorman, author of Church Life in the Thirteenth Century,

It gave first, the regular worship of the Church on Sundays and weekdays.  It gave also the opportunities of Christian baptism, matrimony and burial, together with a little teaching and some spiritual direction mainly administered in the confessional.  Further, it offered to the sick and the dying spiritual comfort and perhaps, in some places, medical help as well. (p. 151)

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