On Validation During the Writing Process (and why it’s okay for writers to want that too)

I’ve written before on the topic of writers and validation.

That previous post was related to which form of publishing one might chose to pursue (self-publishing vs. traditional), and what that choice may or may not say about one’s need for acknowledgement by writing industry professionals, which in turn may or may not relate to the strength of one’s self esteem.

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Recent Reads – April to October 2018

I haven’t done nearly enough reading this year.

I started 2018 off strong, with my previous Recent Reads post from January to March including four completed books.

(Well technically, three books and one novella, but one of those books was a reference for the next historical fiction novel I plan to write.  Reading that required highlighting and note-taking that slowed me down considerably, and perhaps balances out the novella’s shorter length.)

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“Mistakes Were Made”: More Thoughts on Having My Novel Critiqued

I always believed that I was a good writer.

This is a fairly common trait among writers and not necessarily a bad thing.  No one would spend the necessary months or years to write a novel if they didn’t on some level believe themselves good at it, or at least capable of getting better.

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Some Positive Affirmations to Guide You (and Me) Through the Writing Critique Process

Writing is not a team sport, except for when it eventually becomes one.

Overall, I consider writing the most solitary of the arts.  Not only does writing a novel involve spending months, if not longer, alone inside one’s head trying to reproduce the drama unfolding therein, the interim stages of an unfinished novel hold next to no interest.

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How NOT to Console Someone When They are Upset

Lately, I’ve been thinking that a lot of people don’t seem to know how to comfort someone who’s feeling sad.

Part of this, I suspect, has to do with societal perceptions of sadness itself.  It’s seen as a “negative” emotion—a state of mind meant to be avoided and eliminated as much as possible, by whatever means necessary.

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